Teamsters Local 237

SSAs Protect and Inspire the Next Generation

School Safety Agents don’t only keep our students safe, they foster genuine connections and often serve as role models and mentors to the children they protect. And that doesn’t end on graduation day. Local 237 recently participated in the “Future in Focus: Career and College Fair” sponsored by the United Federation of Teachers and the New York City Central Labor Council.

The fair, attended by more than 400 New York City high school students, presented students with the vast array union career choices available to them. In addition to broadening their job options, the fair served to inform students of the benefits of union membership. 26 unions participated.

Terence Elmore, a School Safety Agent assigned to the Community Affairs Unit, represented Local 237 at the fair. He told the Chief-Leader, “Many unions—including Teamsters Local 237—provide more benefits than most people realize. We have so many resources for the members, including free financial planning and free or discounted legal assistance. Life throws you curveballs, but your union is there for you.”

Elmore recognized some of the kids from his work as an SSA. He told them “I’ve been a School Safety Agent since 1998 and I’m proud to be a union member.”

Local 237 President Gregory Floyd explained, “Our members and union are a part of the community. All Local 237 members provide critical services, but the important roles they play go beyond their job descriptions. As a union, we are here to support them and strengthen our communities. It’s important for students to know the full range of opportunities available to them, especially those who do not plan to attend college.”

Local 237 is also proud to sponsor the annual “My School has Rhythm, Not Violence” competition. The program is designed to help students reduce verbal and physical violence through education and creative expression.

Oral History Project

Hercules Cornish: Caretaker J Stores Man

Herclules CornishHercules Cornish went to work for the Housing Authority as a caretaker J in 1952 and retired 24 years later as a stores worker. He died the year following this interview, which was conducted in June 1999.

Originally I was from Harlem, but when I came out of the service in 1945 my wife had moved to the Bronx, so I moved there, too. I went to work for the New York City Housing Authority in 1952.

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